Jun
17
2010

AOC Update June 17, 2010

For the past couple of weeks, I have been trying to put together the major puzzle for AOC, which is the schedule for the show: when the artist teaches, which room, based on how many students I think will sign up and all based on their own personal wishes, and various tasks they may be required to perform at the show, such as set up, demo, sign books, etc. Well, when you take all the information x 30 or so artists x 13 rooms x 4 days, throw in some oil, acrylics, a little watercolor, a dash of pastel and a bit of pencil, a girl like me has to take a deep breath and procrastinate just a tad longer...
I actually had made three previous attempts at the puzzle, but just could not get it right. Plus with the background office "noise" - phones ringing, questions answered, orders for workshops taken, supplies described, laughter (or groans), directions given - my concentration just kept getting interrupted. Another day had passed and I still did not have this crucial part of the planning for AOC 2010!
Meanwhile, I made it through all the other piles of "stuff I need to get to later" and was down to just the schedule. Once the schedule is complete, that begins a whole new "stuff I need to get to later" pile.
About 2pm, I came up with the solution. Leave! I grabbed my laptop and put all the important papers in a folder and left for home. I set up at the kitchen table at the Queen's chair and proceeded to work on the puzzle. Okay, where's my folder? Geez, I'm so used to having my info right where I need it. Thank you Christina for scanning and e-mailing "the IMPORTANT paper" to me!
After four hours and fifteen minutes straight, I have it! YEH! The puzzle is complete.
I'm pretty sure this year's schedule will work for everyone! I will be posting everything on line within my usual time frame, so please check back to the Web site!

 

Jun
17
2010

When Art Grants End by M Theresa Brown

 

The art world is all up in arms. Every place you turn to there is some article about the government or the states reducing or eliminating public money for artist grants. Frantic emails are sent out, art groups gather to protest the fund reductions and open Facebook polls. But there is not an organization out there in today's economic climate who has NOT had to tighten their belts.


So why the fuss?  Let's examine the world of art grants a little less passionately and you may find that reducing or even ending art grants could, in the long run benefit more artists than grants!


How many artists do you know who have benefited from an art grant?


How many artist's do you know whose careers were launched with an art grant?


How happy is the public with the art that is awarded most of the grants?


How happy are you, as an artist, with the art that seems to universally get the art grants?


How politically entwined are the monies for the art grants?


Do you know an artist who makes a living from an art grant?


I ask these questions from the knowledge and life of an artist whose living comes from the sales of her artwork. It has not been easy. But nothing worth doing comes easy and therein lies the lure of the grant-easy money. In reality most grants are almost akin to winning the lottery. Many apply, only one wins. But most lottery players do not make winning the lottery their life work-they still continue to work, raise families and produce in their jobs. How many artists could be so much further along in their careers if they took the bull by the horn and did not spend their life searching for art grants?


Before NC  instigated the Lottery, the people I talked to from states where the Lottery was established always prefaced goals with "when I win the lottery." I remember thinking that everything they wanted to do seemed to be on hold until they won the lottery...but what if they never did?


Waiting for help? Look what has happened to the southern coastal states right now, in the throes of the BP oil gusher, facing the biggest disaster those states have ever faced? Where is the help? The government money? The "helping hand?" Small towns all along the Gulf coast have done what Americans have always done before free promises of free money....... getting the job done themselves! It has been all over the news and I could cheer for their efforts.  Actions do indeed speak louder than words!   You get things done by rolling up your sleeves and getting to work. Solve the problem yourself or with a dedicated group behind you.


And for me, that is the answer to many of the problems in the arts...instead of  waiting for free money, make it happen.


What would happen if a core group in each state decided to "take matters into their own hands" and create an art community free of the federal and state restrictions that come with all grant monies? What if public art opportunities were judged by the public instead of a state or federally funded jury looking for political correctness? What if artists learned how to present themselves and their art to corporations, companies, towns and businesses looking for art. What if artists individually took matters into their own hands?
Why not see the reduction or ending of grant money as an opportunity rather than a disaster.  OK, so there is less of what was there before. Everyone is tightening the belt-at home, at work, at play.... is that so bad? With some positive re-thinking of the art grant situation, more doors could open up to more artists. More diverse Opportunities could be available to far more artists who have chosen art as their field of interest if the dream of free money is not there. We all know someone wins the lottery and we all know some artist gets an available grant..but what of the many, many who tried but did not?


Sometimes life becomes less complicated when you decide that your success will come when you begin to work at it...maybe there is something to that saying "when the going gets tough, the tough get going" after all! :-)

Art Career Experts

 

Jun
16
2010

Painting in Your Own Backyard by Deb Bartos

This sounds like something you would do if you were three and your mother was hanging clothes on the line.  It is really excellent art education advice.  Ordinary and mundane objects can be the best subjects ever.  An added advantage is not wasting time or money on the commute to painting expeditions.

Consider the impressionists and what they painted.  Their subjects were their families, each other, a table set for lunch, a vase of flowers.  OK, there was Renoir and the women and Degas and the ballet dancers, but they generally painted every day life.  Impressionism was just a phrase coined by an art critic who said they were not finished paintings, but “impressions.” He saw them as rough sketches instead of the smooth blended strokes of Salon and Academy paintings.  The artists who exhibited their work together and were eventually called “The Impressionists” were interested in capturing the everyday moments that mattered to them.

I always think I’ll paint if I travel, as there will be subjects to inspire me.  Truthfully, I’m inspired to paint when I start painting something.  It gets more interesting the more I pay attention.  When I travel, I am captivated by eye candy everywhere and can’t stand still long enough to paint. I have to go see everything there is to see.

Walking down Santa Fe’s Canyon Road with a photographer friend, she asked me to stop as she just had to shoot something.  It was a cigarette butt.  I got a good laugh and a good reminder of “beauty in the eye of the beholder.”  It was a stunning composition with great color and background design. I would have never seen it otherwise, as I was too busy looking at the wonderful architecture and art in abundance there.

Another artist friend received instruction in an art class to “find something ugly and paint it beautifully.”  This is an interesting idea, and an even more interesting value judgment. What makes something ugly or beautiful? How do we as artists decide what to paint and how? What do we see and invite others to look at?

Art has endless possibilities. There are always enough subjects to go around, and painting from life is more challenging and real than painting from reference photos. You can get away with it if you do both, but life is the best! It is warm outside and summer in most places so even better! Enjoy, and keep on painting!

Poppy Passion 9 x 12 oil by Deb Bartos ©2010                 Backyard Poppies 8 x 10 oil by Deb Bartos©2010

www.bartosart.blogspot.com

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