May
12
2010

Where to Take Figure Drawing Classes by Angeline Marie Martinez

 


I was asked recently where to take figure drawing classes. Here are some ideas of how to go about finding at least a group that has a model:

1. Check the local community college for credit & non-credit courses. 
2. Take an online class 
3. Go to the local library and check out DVDs, books, etc. about figure drawings. 
4. Jerry's Artarama has DVDs for free short term rentals at the stores.
5. Contact local art communities and/or galleries.
6. The CD to buy with models on it is called Virtual Pose. Use without worrying about copyright.
7. Visit www.wetcanvas.com and check the forums. This is a great source that might help you with your search.
8. Practice gesture drawings, etc. while watching TV, at the mall, park, etc. This happens to be a great conversation starter, too!

Smiles!
Angeline Marie of 
www.angelinemarie.net
May
12
2010

March Artist of the Month - Babatola Oguntoyinbo

 

About Tola Jerry's Artist of the month for March 2010

Tola currently lives in Chapel Hill, NC. He grew up in Beaufort, South Carolina the son of Nigerian parents. He attended boarding school in the northeast, returning to the south to attend college at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1991. In 2006 he graduated again from UNC Chapel Hill with a Master's degree from the School of Journalism and Mass Communication as a Roy H. Park Fellow. He currently works as a social media consultant and software developer through his start-up, Sonecast.



Artist Statement

I love painting and the more I explore it, the more I've learned that art imitates life and life imitates art. The process of painting to me is fascinating. I've been learning that painting is as much about navigating my own internal dynamics as it is about any artistic ability I might have. One of the greatest challenges I encounter when painting is getting out of my own way and setting aside my own early expectations of what a piece needs to be. Time and time again I find that letting go is the key to successfully finishing a painting. It's the feeling of surprise and understanding that I get when a painting finally comes together that keeps me coming back and excited to continue working. The more I paint, the more I learn. I'm incredibly thankful for the lessons in conflict, fear, perseverance, growth, understanding, joy, happiness, strength, and confidence that have been part of the fabric of my experience as a painter. One of the most interesting things I've found as an artist is that no matter how ugly a piece gets as I'm working on it, with a little bit of faith (ok, sometimes a giant sea tanker full) and a willingness to keep going, it always ends up working out – almost without exception.

I hope you enjoy the work here as much as I have enjoyed creating it, painting is truly a labor of love for me in every sense of the word.











http://www.facebook.com/babatola.oguntoyinbo
Babatola on Facebook

See more of Tola's paintings and information online in Jerry's Art Community Section
May
12
2010

Venus to Olympia: An Art Timeline by Heather Goldstein

 

Titian. Venus of Urbino. C. 1538 Oil on Canvas

One of the most highly acclaimed Italian painters of the Renaissance, Titian, is well known for his beautiful portrait of a reclining nude, Venus, for the duke of Urbino. Titians mastery of color and ability to please his patrons gave him great success in his practice as an artist. This particular painting has been a hot topic of discussion among art historians for many years and continues to have numerous interpretations. Aside from the title, there are a number of clues in this painting that suggest it is a portrait of Venus. The maids in the background and bedroom setting suggest high status and domestication. The red flowers in her hand represent love. The white sheet she lays on represents purity. And the dog curled up at the foot of the bed represents fidelity.

However, there is more to this painting than a beautiful image of Venus. Images such as this were popular in the Renaissance's sophisticated court circles where men could enjoy these images under the guise of appreciating classical mythology. Venus of Urbino lends itself to this interpretation through its sexualized and provocative nature, not usually associated with Venus. For one, her relaxed, seductive pose and coy tilting of the head is inviting to the viewer. There is also a dark curtain behind her dividing the canvas and leading the eye to her hand, which is strategically placed to cover herself.

This is one interpretation of this work and as we study we always learn more.


Edouard Manet. Olympia. 1863. Oil on Canvas

The French painter, Manet, sometimes referred to as the father of modernism, was definitely ahead of his time and liked to stir things up in the art world. Titian's Venus of Urbino inspired one of his most famous paintings, Olympia. However, the interpretation of this image caused quite a stir when it was presented at the 1865 Salon. For one, the technique used was extremely avant-garde for the traditional smoothly modeled taste of the academic French Salons. Olympia is painted mostly as an outline with very abrupt changes in color and a more raw, unfinished, preliminary appearance.

More shocking at the time, however, was the implication that Olympia was a prostitute. Unlike Titian's Venus coy look, Olympia stares confidently with confrontation at the viewer. Instead of a loyal dog at her feet, there is a cat with its back arched. There is also an African-Caribbean woman with flowers instead of the maids. At that time, painting black women was another sexualized reference. But of course, Manet took the compositional cues from Titian as well, such as the curtain leading to her hand that covers her, but in a more assertive way than Venus' relaxed pose.

Olympia was displayed in the last gallery over the door. After awful reviews from art critics, people attended to see this "offensive" piece of art.

Some effects on contemporary art...

Wafaa Bilal. Midwest Olympia. 2005 Photography.

This is the artist's interpretation of Olympia as a woman of today.

Yasumasa Morimura. Olympia. 1999. Photography.

Morimura is known for his appropriated images of Western art. He uses himself and costume, painting, cosmetics, and computer manipulation.

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