Feb
24
2012

LUKAS 1862 Oils: A Letter From Jerry's President

Compromise on cost, not quality!

As many of you may know, this year is LUKAS' 150th Anniversary!  Founded in 1862 by Dr. Franz Schoenfeld, LUKAS has been making professional paints ever since, and are internationally recognized as a top artists' color maker.  Using only the finest pigments, binders, and milling methods, LUKAS colors are used by professional and amateur artists the world over.

 

Ira Goldstein, President of Jerry's Artarama, has written a few words to you about LUKAS 1862 Oil Colors, the flagship line of this unique paint brand:

Classic oil colors were made using the finest pigments in full concentration with no fillers. They were ground very well and used only the purest linseed oil as their vehicle.

Over the years there has been a proliferation of student quality paints masquerading as artists' colors, when in reality they do not produce the finished result of classical oil colors.

It is our desire that our customer uses the highest quality art materials. So we have worked with world-renowned paint manufacturer LUKAS to be able to offer you 1862 Oil Colors at a price that anyone can afford.

Please read the product reviews for 1862 Oils on our website from artists of all skill levels, professionals and educators.

If you are an educator, please contact me and I can arrange samples for you of this wonderful paint.

Wishing you a pleasurable painting experience,

Ira Goldstein
President, Jerry's Artarama

Clearly, we think LUKAS is such a great line and are sure you'll love it! But don't just take our word for it: Vincent van Gogh was a fan of LUKAS professional oil colors, as he stated in a letter to his brother Theo.  But van Gogh isn't the only fan -- since Jerry's brought this revolutionary artist paint line to the US, customer reviews from artists of all skill levels have simply poured in!

 

Here are just a few reviews on LUKAS 1862 Oils, from artists like you:

  • "I use LUKAS 1862 oils exclusively. I work with paint directly out of the tubes not using any mediums. I do the majority of each piece using painting knives and really enjoy the blending ability of LUKAS paints; LUKAS paints can be blended into subtle shades because of their heavy pigment load and their creamy consistency. The other major plus for me is that the paint is touch dry in 2-3 days allowing me to continue to add to my works without disturbing the underpainting. I have no negative issues with LUKAS 1862 oils, thank you and keep up the good work!"
  • "I am an artist who specializes in realism and dabbles in abstract. This line of paint has a great feel and saturation rate at a good price. I would recommend it to anyone."
  • "I have used LUKAS artist quality (LUKAS 1862) for several years and it has never disappointed. LUKAS paints are the same from batch to batch, i.e. a new tube of a color is the same as my 'old' tube. And the price is a BIG PLUS."
  • "I am a colorist by nature. Either I have suddenly truly mastered color separation and placement or these paints are more brilliantly colored, more intense, more reflective than those I've used in the past. I suspect the beeswax has something to do with this but can't prove it. I love them and do not expect to return to purchasing other oil color brands but will simply use up what I have left by adding LUKAS painting butter. I also love the fact these act and feel like real oils, working wet in wet, but dry in a few days. As I work primarily alla prima this is an excellent match for me and speeds up my production schedule!"
  • ...and so many more online!

Have you used LUKAS 1862 Professional Oil Colors? Do you think you might now? Tell us your thoughts, regale us with your experiences, and share links to your art done with LUKAS oils in the comments below!

Feb
16
2012

Earliest copy of the Mona Lisa found in Spain

Da Vinci's famous masterpiece, copied alongside the original!

Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa — probably the most famous painting in the world, right? It's also one of the most copied paintings in the world, with dozens if not hundreds of replicas created over the centuries. Everyone recognizes it, many love it: "iconic" is certainly a good descriptor of its impact.

Now, we have even more to learn about this masterpiece. Just this month, the Prado Museum in Spain unveiled an amazing discovery: what is believed to be the earliest copy of da Vinci's famous piece, most likely painted right alongside the master in his own studio. The Art Newspaper reported the findings, and the news took the art world by storm.

For years, the Prado had in its collection what appeared to be a pretty standard Mona Lisa copy — in fact, some thought it was a pretty poor copy, as the background was a swath of black paint, instead of the dream-like landscape seen in the original. It turns out this black background had been added later, possibly during the 18th century, for reasons unknown, as discovered when the copy was scanned and underdrawings shockingly similar to those of the original were uncovered.

The Prado and the Louvre in Paris (where the original Mona Lisa resides behind layers of glass and security) have determined, based on various factors including panel composition, age, and the fact that the underdrawing of the copy changed and developed in a similar fashion to that of the original, that this copy was most likely painted concurrently with the original: side by side with Leonardo, probably by one of his more respected apprentices.

Now that the layers of black paint have been painstakingly removed from the copy, we can see the ethereal landscape background — and since the copy has been restored and cleaned, we have a much clearer view of the Mona Lisa herself. As da Vinci's original is priceless and irreplaceable, chances are it will never be cleaned; meaning its layers of cracked and darkened varnish will forever cloud our view. Since the copy is no longer so occluded, we can see Mona Lisa perhaps more as she was: a lovely lady much younger than the original makes her appear. Other details, such as the spindles on her chair, the delicate, semi-transparent veil around her shoulders — and yes, even her eyebrows — are far more visible in this copy and can tell art historians much about the original that was thought lost to time.

Next month, the Prado copy will travel to the Louvre for an upcoming da Vinci show, and the two paintings will be reunited after 500 years apart.

(And speaking of the Mona Lisa, here at Jerry's Artarama we're pretty tickled about this new discovery. We ourselves, with help from you, just completed our own copy of the Mona Lisa, as featured on our 2012 catalog cover. While not painted alongside Leonardo, this version of the Mona Lisa was painted by you, our customers and contest entrants, and compiled by PictureMosaics.com into the mosaic masterpiece replica that is our thanks to you for your continued support. Who would have known that the timing would be so appropriate?)

So what are your thoughts on this newest discovery in the art world? Is the Prado Mona Lisa copy a star or a sham? Which version do you prefer, and why? Let us know in the comments below!

Feb
14
2012

Prove It! Can you really get the same effects with water-mixable oil paints?

Prove It Art Marketing Videos

Prove It!

In this segment of Prove It! Mikey G will solve the mystery of water-mixable oil paints and test how they measure up against traditional oils. Can water really mix with oil? How do LUKAS Berlin Water-Mixable Oil Colors compare with traditional oils in terms of consistency, body, and clean up? Watch the video to find out!

Please enjoy this Prove It! video and let us know what you think in the comments below!

Are you a fan of water-mixable oil paints? Looking for a less toxic way to paint in oils? Tell us about it in the comments below!

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