May
12
2010

Tips on Composition of a Painting by Tom Jones

 


Composition is a very important part of the painting process. A good composition makes your painting more pleasing to the viewer and will enhance your chances to sell more paintings. Let me start by suggesting that you use a pencil to draw a very light vertical line down the center of the paper and likewise, draw a line horizontally through the center of the paper. This will help you avoid placing objects of importance in the center of the painting. The other reason for the lines is to help you from ending or starting object at those lines such as a horizon line or the edge of a tree or building.

(Example) Avoid having your horizon line in the middle of the paper, but rather have it no more than one third of the way from the top or bottom of the paper. An example for the vertical line is do not have the edge of a tree or building stop or start on the vertical center line.

Have the painting set up so you have three planes: something in the foreground, middle ground and background. This gives the painting depth and allows the viewer to walk into the scene.

When painting each corner area should be different. This avoids repetitiveness. When painting or repeating objects, such as buildings or trees, have different shapes and colors. As an example, when painting two trees in the foreground, have one warm in color and one cool. Have one thick and one thinner or one slightly closer in the scene. Overlap buildings to improve interests and design. Add life to the scene with people, animals or birds. Place your center of interest slightly left or right of the center line and slightly above or below the horizon line. Try to have objects such as the tops of trees or sails go out of the frame. Clouds also should go out the sides or top of the frame. This will give your painting a more realistic and professional appearance. When placing objects in the foreground, have trees and fence posts end above the horizon line as this will give you more depth and better perspective in the scene.

After completing a painting take a few days or even a week to study the painting and turn it sideways and upside down. This will help you see little things more clearly. Ask a couple friends and fellow artist to critique your painting. By following my suggestions in this article over and over you can't help but to become a happier and more skilled artist.

You may send comments or questions to me at by email at Tom@TomJonesArtist.com
And please check out my interactive web site. TomJonesArtist.com
May
12
2010

Good Night, Sweet Prints by Wilson Bickford

Okay, ........so I know I'll probably ruffle a few feathers with this week's entry, but I'm just going to state my own personal opinions regarding art "prints". I've never been an advocate of the print market and here's why.
Is it just me or has greed taken over the print market? And I don't mean just recently, because it's always seemed that way to me.
The concept is simple enough; take an artistic image and reproduce it for mass sales at a more affordable rate to the common man.
But I fail to see the sense of charging $400 - $500 for a sheet of paper with an image of a painting on it. Especially when there are 2 or 3 thousand of them in existence.
Now, the consensus is that, "The price of the print is relative to the price of the original." The bottom line is that it's still a sheet of paper with an image of a painting on it. I can't get past that, I'm sorry.
In the old days, we had offset lithography as the main means of reproducing artwork. To get the "best price per unit," the artist had to order a very large quantity of said image. I know of several fellow artists who have stacks of prints left in storage, having sold 20 or 30 out of 1,500. Why? Because with that many around they are not really considered rare anymore and they were priced too high.
With the advent of the Inkjet printer and "Giclee’s," it seems anyone with a desktop printer is trying to make their own prints now. Of course, the advantage of this type of printing is that you can print 1, 50 or 100 and not be forced into a huge lot. You can literally "Print as you go." But, as a result it seems there are nothing but "open editions" whereby this image can be printed indefinitely and exhausted until there's no demand left whatsoever.
Does THAT add to the value?? Knowing that it's possible to replicate an unlimited number of copies kind of takes away the appeal, doesn't it?
Well, at least it does for me. Hey, it's just a sheet of paper with an image of a painting on it!

www.wilsonbickford.com

May
12
2010

Art Careers by Chris Cudworth


Career and art do not seem to go in the same sentence for most people. I get asked what I do for a living and I answer"“I am a professional artist." If you are an artist, chances are you will hear "I can't draw" or "I cannot draw a stickfigure." If I were a mechanic instead, the first response would be "Where do you work." Why is this? Are artists some mysterious unemployed lot? Do we have stigma as being untouchable? Art has had to fend off the media splash of being "Controversial" in the 80s and has had backlash since. I find there are many who seem to really love art but have not stepped into a gallery in years ….. or ever.

This is such a big question for me, why do people who do not consider themselves artists feel this way?
It brings me back to running themes within the art community: where does one go with a degree in the arts? How do you market your art when you get out of school? What is the definitive of an art community? I think community is the biggest key to why the general public is removed. Unavailable and often frustrated, artists need a community like everyone else.
Lets face it, we live in a very commercial and product driven society. Unless you live on an isolated island, this world revolves on research driven pre-selected demographics and spoon-fed advertising. Artists who are involved in advertising usually promote whichever client they are catering to, not art in general. Why is this important?
Despite art generating billions for advertising, usually promoting the very thing that drives the product is not what ads are driven by. There may be demographics for "Arts lost," "Art programs needed," but loosely generated ideas that cater only to flashy headlines. Visual art is part of an entertainment genre and has held fast to traditions of a society that had free time to spend. Time constraints and skewed thoughts about art from the media has poisoned the well that so many artists took for granted and drank deeply from.
We need to use the sources that communicate for us. Mainstream media, internet and finally, relationships with people makes art a forefront. Letting people know that a great day out can mean they can relax and love and hate different art with the freedom to do so.
That even if they cannot make "Perfect art" what really is perfect art?
Who are they competing with? Do they need to compete and have a constantly flowing wellspring of creativity to make art? No. They just need to know that art, is truly for everyone. Relaxation or pursuit, artists, in general, must accept all levels and be patient with those who wish to be a part of a vibrant movement.
Get a group, have some coffee, and dispel some myths about art. Grassroots can become a healthy lawn if those who for wish change just tend it!

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