Dec
13
2014

The 2015 Pantone Color of the Year Winner

It's Marsala!

Every year, Pantone, the creator of the Color Matching System that standardized color reproduction, picks their color that will represent the new year. This year, Pantone has chosen the earthy red hue of Marsala to represent the new year in color.

Pantone travels the world to observe color trends every year in search of their next color of the year and had been paying attention to Marsala's growing popularity in new pieces of art, fashion and other areas of design.  They chose the color Marsala because of its versatility, its embodiment of confidence and stability. This hue is a stable color that sells and performs well in multiple markets. 

Pantone's color of the year has had considerable influence in years past with several industries including home and industrial design, the professional art scene, consumer packaging, fashion and the beauty products market. 

 

Pantone's Color of the Year 2010-2014

Pantone's color of the year have been representative of our culture and the changing times for decades now. During the 1960s, colors like Hot Pink, Cyan Blue, Bright Violet and Lemon Chrome were picked in response to the changing culture and social revolution. Then in the seventies, colors were picked in conjunction with the environmental movement and the recession. More earthy and less flashy colors were chosen such as Avocado, Burnt Sienna and Harvest Gold. The eighties or the MTV generation saw brighter colors again such as Royal Blue, Ribbon Red, and Radiant Orchid. And so on...

Do you plan on using Marsala in 2015 for any of your art? Do you think we will start to see more shades of Marsala in our paint lines now that it has been chosen as the definitive color of 2015? Let us know in the comments below!

Dec
11
2014

Still Time to Enter Jerry's Fall Painting Contests!

Win Big This Winter!

Just a reminder that there are still major prizes on the line this year in our Fall Painting Contests. Until December 31st, 2014 we still have two great painting contests running each with $2,250 in prizes! Details Below:


2014 Fall SoHo Painting Contest

Acrylics, Oil Colors, Watercolors and Colored Pencils

SoHo Urban Artist is dedicated to bringing fine art materials to both amateur and professional artists the world over. From high quality oils, acrylics, and watercolors to colored pencils, pastels, studio easels, seating to canvas, palettes, brush cleaners and more. SoHo Urban Artist art supplies provide any artist with a thorough and well-rounded studio set-up at excellent savings. No matter the medium and no matter the skill level, every artist can benefit from the affordable, quality art materials provided by SoHo Urban Artist.

 

How To Enter

 Enter up to 2 paintings may be entered per contestant, and each painting may be represented by two separate images. The required first image must show the painting in its entirety from the front. The optional second image should show a detail view of the work, such as a close up of the paint texture of the focal point of the painting.

  • Please name each image with the painting title and artist name.
  • Works must be submitted as a digital image in JPG format only.
  • PowerPoint format is not accepted. 
  • The image resolution should be no lower than 150 dpi and no higher than 300 dpi.
  • The file size should not exceed 10MB (megabytes).
  • You will receive e-mail confirmation once your work has been received.
  • In the "Statement of Recommendation" box located on the contest entry form, please explain why you enjoyed using SoHo products and why you would recommend them to others.

 

Enter at on our Jerry's Artarama 2014 Fall SoHo Painting Contest Page

 

Contest ends December 31st, 2014

 

 Last Years' Winners

 


 

2014 Fall Matisse Derivan Painting Contest

Acrylics

Since 1964, Derivan has provided artists all over the world with fine acrylic products, including their famous Matisse range of professional acrylics. Based in Australia, the founders wanted to start a company "to make available to artists worldwide a premium paint, whilst remaining environmentally and socially responsible." The company has done just that, growing from a tiny business that operated out of stables in Sydney's inner city, to a multinational corporation. They are truly an innovative company, introducing the first student grade acrylics in the 1960s, as well as thee first non-toxic screen and block printing inks! Until recently, the company was known as "Matisse Derivan" as Matisse Acrylics were their only product at that time.

 

How To Enter

 Enter up to 2 paintings may be entered per contestant, and each painting may be represented by two separate images. The required first image must show the painting in its entirety from the front. The optional second image should show a detail view of the work, such as a close up of the paint texture of the focal point of the painting.

  • Please name each image with the painting title and artist name.
  • Works must be submitted as a digital image in JPG format only.
  • PowerPoint format is not accepted. 
  • The image resolution should be no lower than 150 dpi and no higher than 300 dpi.
  • The file size should not exceed 10MB (megabytes).
  • You will receive e-mail confirmation once your work has been received.
  • We would love to get your recommendation. In the "Statement of Recommendation" bod located on the contest entry form, please explain why you enjoyed using Matisse Acrylics and why you would recommend them to others.

 

Enter at on our Jerry's Artarama 2014 Fall Matisse Derivan Painting Contest Page


Contest ends December 31st, 2014

 

 Last Years' Winners


 

Dec
9
2014

Can Blind People See Art with their Tongue?

Will the blind soon be able to taste the Mona Lisa?

With the advent of some revolutionary new technology, blind people are now able to process images sent directly to the brain-from their tongues!

Although we have very little understanding of how our brains work, it would seem that our brains are adept at fixing problems we once thought impossible. For example, replacing our the broken rods and cones from our eyes with the taste receptors and nerves of our tongues. The body and brain are incredibly adaptable and while we often think of sight and hearing as our two most important senses, our other senses are able to pick up the slack and our brains take care of the rest. 

So now with the help of a new device, blind people are becoming able to actually process visual information through the nerves on the tongue through small electrical shocks. Don't worry though, while it sounds painful, it actually feels more like "soda bubbles" on the tongue. What's amazing though is that the brain is able to take the way a visual image feels on our tongue and translates that information to the brain. Then the brain handles the rest.

Here's How It Works

This new revolutionary device is called the BrainPort System, created by Wisconsin based company Wicam Inc. The device looks like a pair of glasses with a camera on them connected to a hand held device and a sensor that looks like a small pad/wafer that sits on the tongue. The camera pixelates what it sees and transfers the image to the hand unit. The hand unit then translates the image and sends that information to the tongue sensor. The sensor then sends small shocks to the nerves in the tongue.

 

The device works on a system of "sensory substitution". The brain is able to process that the shocks have nothing to do with taste and reroutes them to the visual center of the brain to process and interpret what the camera sees. Although the brain is only able to produce a rudimentary image, the brain can process it just the way that it would as if it were getting the information from the person's own eyes.

 

What This Means for Art

So what does this mean for art? That blind people will finally be able to experience the beauty in our world, the art created by man, and of course, create art for themselves. Blindness affects over 1 million adults over the age of 40 in the USA, many of them losing sight over time. Artists who have lost their sight and ability to paint coherently will be able to paint, draw and sculpt again. Currently the device is still being developed and the current model runs for about $15,000. The images the BrainPort System creates still looks very pixelated, however, soon, technology, mixed with the power of the brain and the taste buds on the tongue, could bring about an art revolution by people who have never been able to properly experience it as a visual medium. 

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