May
12
2010

Preserving our Past by Wilson Bickford


As artists, we are able to record the details of our generation for all posterity.
To prove my point, I will mention two names: George Washington and Jesus Christ. Upon reading those names, it's without question that a "visual" popped into your head, correct?

The reason is that you have a reference to these two individuals because of artists' interpretations through the centuries. There are countless examples such as these and I simply picked these two because they are so well-known. Christ has been portrayed through imagination (no one really knows what he looked like) by thousands of artists and Washington posed several times for portraitist Gilbert Stuart, among others.

Anything that is in threat of becoming obsolete or extinct can be captured by the artist as a record or reminder to future generations.
Although photography wasn't in existence back in the day and art was the sole means of documentation, we can still use our skills to this end today.
I am an animal lover and activist for their rights and I often consider the dwindling species on this planet, which may well become extinct, never to be seen again. I recently felt compelled to render this polar bear, because their habitat is diminishing. It will be a major shame should we lose these magnificent creatures.
I challenge you to paint something that may not last forever. Just do it while you still can!
Whether it's a rustic old barn, a crumbling lighthouse or an endangered animal species.
Your portrayal today can serve as a reminder for the world tomorrow.
wilsonbickford.com
May
12
2010

February Artist of the Month - Kira Ayn Varszegi

 February Jerrys Artarama Artist of the Month



Kira Ayn Varszegi - Hartford, CT

I'm a self-taught, self-representing professional artist/photographer, best known for my breast paintings and past collaborative projects with Koopa the turtle (now retired from painting.) My body of work is largely abstract and colorful with neutrals available somewhat rarely. I've been offering fine art breast paintings on eBay since 2001. I'm the first internet-based professional to treat the method as a fine art rather than a novelty/fundraiser/fetish. I enjoy working in different styles and finding new ways to get my medium onto my support. I paint with brushes, palette knives, various body parts, fruits & vegetables, and toys (wind-up, RC, etc.) Familiar mediums include oil, acrylic, tempera, gouache, enamel, crayons,cocoa, coffee, red wine, strawberries/cherries/blueberries and melted chocolate.

Much of my work is the result of experimentation with elements, heat, time, gravity, acceleration, and trial & error. My photography is varied - nature, industrial, scenic, macro, long-exposure, B&W, abstract, tasteful self-portraiture, candid, low-light, and sometimes digitally manipulated. A varied, complementary palette and well-balanced composition are essential to me, whether on canvas or in a photograph.

My inspiration doesn't come from other other art or artists. Imitation is NOT "the sincerest form of flattery" when self-proclaimed "artists" constantly steal your ideas. Violations of intellectual property hurt real artists and mislead potential collectors. The human mind is a constantly-evolving source of infinite creative possibilities. Unique ideas/execution, honesty, perseverance, a dash of insanity, and/or technical skill are what define a true artist to me.

I'll wander into gray areas, offend a few people, make mistakes, learn from them, doubt myself & master obscurity out of a mutual fear of failure and success. I'll continue to create from my heart, evolve, experiment, challenge myself, be charitable, and strive to experience a sense of accomplishment that can only be achieved by following my dreams.

Aside from art, I'm a freshwater fishing addict who aspires to become a fully-sponsored Bassmaster one day. I'm also a fan of baseball, science, cryptograms, my husband, geek culture, bacon, Hitchcock movies, skepticism & console gaming (mainly the FPS and puzzle genres.) Currently I'm playing Modern Warfare on PS3 and Modern Warfare 2 on XBL - my GT is TurtleKiss on both systems. :-)

Attached are 5 of my original breast paintings ("New Hope" series - created using only my breasts) and 5 other assorted paintings - all created without the use of a brush.

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Kira Ayn Varszegi






May
12
2010

Devil & Angel: Is Photography Art?

Image by: Ira Goldstein
Angkor Wat
Black and White Photo

JOE DiGiULiO:

This is a difficult question for me as a painter. When I see a "Call to Artist" for a juried show, I tend to look and see if the show will have category awards for Painting, Drawing, Sculpture, Woodworking, Photography and the like. I would consider entering the show if that is the case. I have been to many "juried shows" with open categories and wined up seeing that, of the six or so awards in the show, three or four of the merit awards were photographs. Either the juror is a photographer themselves or the rest of the offered fine art work is not up to snuff. This is very disheartening to a majority of the classic entries of paintings, sculptures or drawings. I consider the fine arts different than a photograph in that the photo is developed from an instrument that replicates reality through the cameras eye while the fine art entries are originated through the minds eye of the artist.

The other part of me, when viewing the work of Ansell Adams for example, looks at his photographs and definitely sees it as "Art." What separates his work is that his compositions were stylized with the shadowed foregrounds in many of his photographs. This has become iconic with his work. It's not the photo as much as it is the style of the composition that creates the sense of "Art" for me. So in the final analysis I do not consider basic photography "Art" unless the photographer has a defined style that has been incorporated in their work.

SHARON DiGiULiO:
Photography is absolutely art!
It takes a keen eye for texture, line, composition and subject matter to take a great photo. There is a ton of creativity that enters in when working with photography either in the field, in the studio or in the development process in the darkroom, or even in the early stages of concept. These are all factors in making or creating a good painting as well. An artist in either choice of materials must push their ideas beyond what has already been created and make something new or different. Each artist faces the same challenges in the creation process by asking questions and solving the problems encountered along the way.

I do think that each process belongs in their own category when it comes to museums or juried shows. I think paintings should compete with paintings, sculpture should compete with sculpture, photography should compete with photography, etc.

digiuliostudios.com

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