May
12
2010

G40 The Summit - The Great American Group Show by TMNK

 


I've just returned from the opening festivities for the group art exhibition created by Art Whino, called G40 The Summit. To conceive of an exhibition consisting of 5 floors, 75,000 square feet of space, and over 500 artists is quite an undertaking. To successfully plan, coordinate, and deliver said show is an awesome accomplishment, for which the Art Whino team should be extremely proud of themselves for. This weekend they wrote an important page into the journals of art history.

Honestly, I really didn't know what to expect. Like most artists, I was simply grateful for another opportunity to share my work with an audience, and to perhaps make a few sales to a new group of collectors. And given the size, magnitude and scope of G40, it was also an opportunity for me to challenge myself to create cohesive visual experience. The goal was to create a show within a show that was powerful, poignant, and stimulating. And so I painted, delivered, then hung and installed my offerings to this great American group exhibition. Then, as if a child performing in their first school production, I sang with the group, yet inside quietly waited for "my part," that brief moment where I would stand out, and my individual greatness would be recognized.

But G40 is not your typical group show, and there are literally five floors of great artists, performers, each with their own powerful and distinctive voice. And as I walked around, I began to understand what actors appreciate about being a member of a great ensemble cast. It truly is not about your own individual performance. It's about the opportunity to meet and work with other great artists whose talents you respect and admire. Artists like Aaron Martin, Remi, Joe Iurato, Kelly, Michael Owen, Sueworks, and HermLife, Kelly Castillo, Jophen Stein, and Jim Mahfood, just to name a few. It's the indescribable feeling you get when one of your peers shares that they admire your work, and wanted to meet you. I guess what I’m saying is, more than showing, it's growing new relationships.

I left humbled, honored to have my small voice included, blended in with the rest of this historic choir. G40 the Summit is not to be missed.

May
12
2010

March Artist of the Month - Babatola Oguntoyinbo

 

About Tola Jerry's Artist of the month for March 2010

Tola currently lives in Chapel Hill, NC. He grew up in Beaufort, South Carolina the son of Nigerian parents. He attended boarding school in the northeast, returning to the south to attend college at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1991. In 2006 he graduated again from UNC Chapel Hill with a Master's degree from the School of Journalism and Mass Communication as a Roy H. Park Fellow. He currently works as a social media consultant and software developer through his start-up, Sonecast.



Artist Statement

I love painting and the more I explore it, the more I've learned that art imitates life and life imitates art. The process of painting to me is fascinating. I've been learning that painting is as much about navigating my own internal dynamics as it is about any artistic ability I might have. One of the greatest challenges I encounter when painting is getting out of my own way and setting aside my own early expectations of what a piece needs to be. Time and time again I find that letting go is the key to successfully finishing a painting. It's the feeling of surprise and understanding that I get when a painting finally comes together that keeps me coming back and excited to continue working. The more I paint, the more I learn. I'm incredibly thankful for the lessons in conflict, fear, perseverance, growth, understanding, joy, happiness, strength, and confidence that have been part of the fabric of my experience as a painter. One of the most interesting things I've found as an artist is that no matter how ugly a piece gets as I'm working on it, with a little bit of faith (ok, sometimes a giant sea tanker full) and a willingness to keep going, it always ends up working out – almost without exception.

I hope you enjoy the work here as much as I have enjoyed creating it, painting is truly a labor of love for me in every sense of the word.











http://www.facebook.com/babatola.oguntoyinbo
Babatola on Facebook

See more of Tola's paintings and information online in Jerry's Art Community Section
May
12
2010

Painting Inspiration by Wilson Bickford

 


I'm very often asked, "How do you get the inspiration or ideas for all of your paintings?"

The truth is that I'm not really sure. Inspiration is one of those things that you don't always see coming and can be triggered by just about anything.
Every artist has subjects which are of particular interest and appeal.
For Monet, it was his water lilies. Van Gogh had a penchant for hay fields.
That's not to say that these subjects were all they painted, but they appear to have held a certain fascination for them, as they rendered them so frequently.

For me, I'd have to say that my favorite subjects are birds and old barns.
I don't know why exactly, but I never tire of those themes.

Now having said that, I also love doing landscapes, still life and florals.
I have found that as the years went by, the scope of my artistic focus has broadened. There are very few things that I don't enjoy painting. Each and every subject has its own challenges, which is an invitation to test yourself and your skills. As an artist, the only way to improve is to keep going a little farther each time you pick up a brush. I've heard the phrase, "You have to go out on the limb, because that's where the fruit is." That is the truest statement I've ever heard, whether in regards to art or just life in general.
As for true inspiration, it's all around us. Keep your eyes open and you'll know when something grabs you. Inspiration simply means that something has struck a chord within you and you feel "connected" to it to the point that you want to capture it on paper or canvas. (Or perhaps with clay, for you sculptors.)

It can be something as dramatic as a spectacular sunset, or as simple as the soft shadows on flower petals. As I've already said, you won't always see it coming, but you'll feel it when it does arrive.
It can knock on your door at any time and that is what makes art such an unpredictable pleasure.

www.wilsonbickford.com

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